Youth Ministry Roundtable – Sydney

When is it happening: Friday 19th February 2016,1 pm – 4pm
Where do I go: The Salvation Army Auburn Corps, 166-170 S Parade, Auburn NSW 3170.
How much does it cost: There is no cost.
Who should attend: Anyone involved in directing youth ministries.

What can I expect?: Discussion of Issues for the Future of Youth Ministry
including reference to the following topics:
• Training, accreditation and support of youth leaders
• The role of intergenerational activities in churches
• Collaboration with parents
• Youth ministry beyond the church
• The role of camps festivals and special events
The Roundtable will provide opportunity for leaders in youth ministry to discuss their work. It will be facilitated by Rev Dr Philip Hughes and Dr Armen Gakavian of the Christian Research Association who have recently completed research projects involving 21 case-studies of youth ministry in various parts of Australia.

You may register for this Roundtable by using the form below.

  1. Your details for registration
  2. (required)
  3. (valid email required)
 

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Pointers December 2015

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

Youth Leadership

In most organisations, leadership is one of the keys to the successful achievement of the organisation’s goals. This is true in relation to church leadership in general and leadership of youth ministry in particular. In our studies of youth ministry across 21 churches in Anglican, Catholic and Salvation Army denominations conducted in 2014 and 2015, we have observed youth leadership, interviewed youth leaders and discussed leadership with young people. This article  discusses some of the findings. For the sake of clarity, we will use the term ‘youth minister’ to refer to the senior or  leading youth leader, and the term ‘youth leader’ to refer to other people who assist the youth minister in the role. It should be noted this was not the way these terms were used in many of the churches we visited.

Lay Pastoral Ministry
In many denominations, non-ordained people are involved in ministry alongside those who are ordained. Research undertaken by the  Christian Research Association between 2006 and 2008 for Uniting and Anglican churches explored the patterns of lay ministry in rural areas. With declining numbers of clergy available for ministry, and declining capacity to support ordained clergy, many denominations have engaged local lay people to take responsibility in leadership (Hughes & Kunciunas, 2008, 2009). Urban churches also often use  non-ordained people as part of a team or to take the responsibility of leadership in small churches. Earlier this year the CRA was  commissioned by the Australian Catholic Council for Lay Pastoral Ministry, of the Australian Catholic Bishops Conference, to carry out research examining lay pastoral ministry in the Catholic Church in Australia. The project involved an exploration of current theological and sociological literature on the topic, and a series of case studies of Catholic parishes in different contexts where lay pastoral ministry is  occurring.This article summarises some of the findings.

Leadership into the Unknown
We all make decisions that have an impact on our future. Yet, we can never be sure what the future will be, and whether our decisions will be right or not. The dilemma is heightened for those in leadership. People expect leaders to know what will be the consequences of their decisions. Leaders often pretend that they do. But leadership, in fact, often means making decisions which have unknown consequences. This is an issue for leaders in church and mission as well as in every other field of endeavour. It was the subject of one of the plenary sessions at the Lausanne International  Researchers’ conference in Kuala Lumpur in May 2015.
The Search for a Public Christianity?
In recent decades, a number of organisations have been established to explore the intersection of faith and Christianity. An early example, the Zadok Centre, was founded in Canberra in 1976 by its inaugural director Dr David Millikan.The article describes a number of such organisations which now exist around the world.
Pilgrimage
This article is based on two papers that were presented at the International Society for the Sociology of Religion held in Belgium. It looks at the different forms pilgrimage takes today, including The Hajj and pilgrimages to Neolithic sites.

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Youth Ministry

A recent book from the USA, Almost Christian: What the Faith of our Teenagers is Telling the American Church, is built on the observation most American young people who are engaged in religion are ‘luke-warm’ about it. They see God as wanting people to be good, nice and fair to each other, but God is not involved in their lives, except to help them serve problems. The author, Kenda Dean, argues that young people are reflecting the attitudes in their families and in their churches. She suggests that young people are not articulate and passionate about the Christian faith because they have not heard a high level of articulation or experienced a high level of passion in their homes or in their churches.

However, Dean does not take into account the research which indicates that young people do not simply copy what they hear and see. They develop it in their own way, to meet their needs and to fit into the picture they have of what life is all about – a picture which is described in the ‘midi-narrative’ of young people. Dean’s suggestions for youth ministry should be taken seriously. Certainly, the faith of parents and church can have a significant impact. It is important to ask if young people have opportunities to express faith, not just verbally but through engagement in projects and mission? Are there opportunities for learning and deepening their sense of what the Christian life is about? Are they engaged to contemplate the deep questions of life? One of the key questions for youth ministry is the extent to which we help young people to find answers … and the extent we focus on those processes which encourage the asking of questions.

For a full review of Kenda Dean’s book, Almost Christian, see: https://www.cra.org.au/products-page/pointers/pointers-vol-23-1-for-downloading/

Church Attendance Among Australian Teenagers

Getting accurate information about the church attendance patterns of Australian teenagers is very difficult. We do know that, if both parents attend church, 52 per cent of their teenage children attended. If just the mother attends, 20 per cent of the teenage children attended, and 6 per cent attend if just the father attends. However, about 22 per cent of young people who go to church schools attend even though neither parent attends.

National surveys indicate that about 15 per cent of all parents attend a church monthly or more often. Our estimation that around 10 per cent of all Australian young people in secondary school attend. However, better information is needed to confirm this figure.

For a discussion of the problems in getting accurate information, see Pointers Vol.23, no.1. To purchase the downloadable edition, go to: https://www.cra.org.au/products-page/pointers/pointers-vol-23-1-for-downloading/